News from April 2017

According to lawmakers, companies that place electronic devices on the market in the EU must guarantee their electromagnetic compatability (EMC). This means that they must not generate unwanted electric or electromagnetic effects that interfere with other devices or vice-versa. The applicable protective requirements or limits are provided for in the relevant standards.

In March 2017, a new draft for the next revision of the DIN EN 61000-3-2 was published. It addresses harmonic currents of devices intended for connection to a public low voltage power supply grid. For the first time, it also provides for specific tests for LED lights with an effective power between 5 and 25 W. Such harmonic current tests for LED lights in this power class have not been required to date and therefore confront manufacturers and importers with new challenges.

The revision of the standard is expected to be published by the end of this year. Hermes Hansecontrol is capable of performing the required harmonic current measurements and helping the affected companies meet the new requirements.

If you have any questions on this topic, please get in touch with your respective sales representative or with our order management hardlines department at the phone number +49(0)40 300 33 73 - 6124 or by email .

Washing machines, hairdryers or cordless screw drivers – the product safety of electronic devices on the EU single market was at the very top of the agenda. Today, various directives provide for the duties of manufacturers, distributors and vendors. They aim to prevent interference, risks to the health and safety of users as well as to reduce energy consumption and minimize environmental impacts.

Economic operators are being held responsible to an increasing degree and, as a result, must deal with new legal requirements on an ongoing basis. It is therefore also imperative to observe new editions or amendments of existing EU directives with implementation requirements for 2016 and 2017.

In our seminar “Conformity of Electrical Devices with Directives” on June 27, 2017 in Hamburg, we will inform you about relevant directives and regulations as well as fundamental requirements and terminology in connection with the European Single Market. In a single day, you have the chance to obtain a complete overview of your duties and learn how to reduce any liability risks.

Here you will find all the important information about content and conditions for participation (only in German). If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at +49 (0) 40 300 33 73 - 13 30 or by sending an email.

News from March 2017

The European Union requires manufacturers and importers to only introduce safe products to the market. The responsible supervisory authorities regularly sample products circulating on the market and check whether consumer goods such as toys or textiles comply with legal requirements. At the same time, a sealed sample is kept at the vendor’s location. If the product results in a complaint, the vendor has to right to have the official control sample or second sample tested to potentially dismiss the objections of the authorities.

The testing of the control sample is subject to strict regulations. Thus, mandatory deadlines must be observed and the specimen may only be opened by an authorized expert. Independent testing institutes like Hermes Hansecontrol offer their support for this purpose. The Hamburg specialist for product safety is authorized to test official control samples and, if necessary, prepares corresponding test assessments or statements regarding a complaint by the official body. This relieves the client of having to deal with the authorities and provides added legal security with respect to statutory requirements.

If you have any questions on this topic, please get in touch with your respective sales representative or our order management department at the phone number +49 (0) 40 300 33 73 - 7310 or by email.

In August 2016, the EU Commission published its amendment of (EU) no. 10/2011 of the plastic regulation, which it had announced well in advance. It contains some new regulatory content for the migration testing of materials and items made of plastic, which are intended for coming into contact with food. This is an issue of immediate concern to Hermes Hansecontrol and its customers.

For example, the guidelines for food simulants have been amended. To determine, for example, whether certain substances can migrate from packaging to food, these simulants are used in accordance with specifically defined criteria. Vegetable oil has been used to date for the category “Foods containing fat” – referred to as food simulant D2. According to Annex Section 3.2 of the new regulation, the two substitute simulants isooctane and 95-percent ethanol can be used instead of oil for migration testing. Hermes Hansecontrol already implemented this amendment in September 2016.

Tighter rules will apply to the testing of repeated use articles in the future: As of September 2017, for example, having a total migration under the legally prescribed threshold will no longer be sufficient. This is accompanied by the requirement that the total migration in the second test is less than in the first one and less in the third test than in the second one. Hermes Hansecontrol will presumably integrate the new mandatory processes beginning in July of this year.

As of September 14, 2018, new thresholds must be observed for the specific migration of metals from plastics. Among other things, the zinc migration threshold for materials in contact with food will be changed to 5 mg/kg of food; in Annex II, aluminum is supplemented with a specific migration threshold of 1 mg/kg of food. In our test laboratories, we want to consider these new regulations one year in advance beginning in September 2017.

If you have any questions on this topic, please get in touch with your respective sales representative or our order management department at the phone number +49 (0) 40 300 33 73 - 7310 or by email.

Mandatory transparency: By law, manufacturers, importers and vendors of textiles and footwear must now provide information as to whether their products comply with legal requirements – for example, with respect to harmful substances. The goal is to better protect consumers and to guarantee their safety.

However, unlike defects in workmanship or color defects, neither the vendor nor the consumer can determine at first glance whether “the chemistry is off or not”. In very few cases is it possible to determine which harmful substances may be in a blouse or sport’s shoe based solely on the odor. Only chemical testing of the product provides clarity.

On June 22, 2017, our seminar “When the Chemistry Is off - Footwear and Textiles” in Hamburg addresses this topic. We inform you about the relevant requirements for textiles and footwear on the European Single Market and offer you possible solutions for putting this into practice on an operational level. Our requirements profiles, for example, impart this knowledge in compact form to help you avoid costly mistakes

Here you will find all the important information about content and conditions for participation (only in German). If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at +49 (0) 40 300 33 73 - 13 30 or by sending an email.

News from February 2017

The European REACh chemicals regulation requires manufacturers and importers to register chemicals and prohibits or restricts the use of “substances of very high concern”. This includes, among other things, persistent chemicals which accumulate in the body with the consumption of food or which are toxic even in small amounts. The same goes for the widely used flame retardant decabromdiphenyl ether (DecaBDE). As an additive, DecaBDE is used in particular in the plastics and textile industry; it is also present in glues, sealants, coatings and printing inks.

Numerous environmental and consumer associations have criticized the use of DecaBDE and Norway has already restricted it. The REACh Regulation (EC) 1907/2006 has now been supplemented accordingly in February 2017. After a two-year transitional period, new requirements will therefore apply as of March 2019: DecaBDE may neither be manufactured nor placed on the market as a substance. Furthermore, DecaBDE may neither be used nor placed on the market as part of another substance, mixture or as an article or part of an article in concentrations of more than 0.1 percent by weight.

Electric and electronic devices, which fall under the Directive 2011/65/EU, are excluded from the new restrictions. It already provides for the placement on the market of devices containing polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) in concentrations exceeding 0.1 percent by weight. Other exceptions and transitional periods apply to the production of aircraft, vehicles and machines.

If you have any questions on this topic, please get in touch with your respective sales representative or our order management department at the phone number +49 (0) 40 300 33 73 - 7310 or by email.

Jeans have firmly established themselves on the runways of Paris’ Haute Couture as much as they have in the working class boroughs of Europe or on the markets of Africa. A garment that continues to be reinvented and, for many, is an essential part of everyday life. Today, jeans production accounts for its own sector in the fashion industry – and manufacturing this garment also requires specialized expertise.

Our special textile training course on denim/jeans on April 27, 2017 in Hamburg explains what makes jeans so unique, their long-standing popularity as well as current technical possibilities. You will learn about all necessary production steps from the acquisition of raw materials to manufacturing threads and surfaces up to and including dyeing and finishing. Aspects relating to quality and ecology are considered in connection with the individual stages of production. This will provide you with a basis for making the right decisions in product development and purchasing.

Here you will find all the important information about content and conditions for participation (only in German). If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at +49 (0) 40 300 33 73 - 13 30 or by sending an email.

News from January 2017

No news in January 2017.


Prüfinstitut Hansecontrol GmbH

Schleidenstrasse 1
22083 Hamburg
Germany
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